Digital skills report

Digital
skills report

Before lockdown many of us may have never used video calls to speak with a doctor, or to attend a work meeting – now it’s difficult to remember a time before. Our digital adoption has enabled us to stay connected through such an uncertain time, but it has not been without its challenges.

Through July and August we asked you to share your feelings towards digital technology in the workplace; evaluating how you use it and identifying opportunities to strengthen digital skills and confidence.

Below are the findings from the digital skills audit completed by colleagues, and the common themes identified through interviews with line managers across the business.

For a full copy of the report, contact Cerys.Grail@hafod.org.uk

 

Data collection

Digital skills online survey

184 colleagues from across the business completed an online digital skills survey via Microsoft Forms. Participants were asked to share:

Research interviews

16 interviews were taken with leaders across the business to discuss their teams’:

  • technical capability using the current technology and infrastructure provided by Hafod
  • confidence and digital attitude to using digital tools, addressing their motivation to learn
  • current methods of communicating, collaborating and learning

Research interviews

16 interviews were taken with leaders across the business to discuss their teams’

  • technical capability using the current technology and infrastructure provided by Hafod
  • confidence and digital attitude to using digital tools, addressing their motivation to learn
  • current methods of communicating, collaborating and learning

The stats – digital skills audit

184 colleagues completed the survey, with 178 respondents able to complete the survey independently.

82% of us use the internet to stay connected to our teams and the wider business, but only 77% believe they have all the skills needed to do their job effectively and 54% agree that improving their digital skills would benefit our service users.

Respondents by area of business

Digital lifestyle

%

93% of respondents use the internet as part of their everyday life

%

33% of those who considered themselves to have a disability or impairment, declared they use voice assistants to support them

%

Of those who don't use the internet every day, 40% were happy with their current usage

%

82% use technology to manage accounts and create documents

%

'I don't know how to do it safely' was the biggest preventative to using the internet more at 24%

%

86% use the internet to access entertainment content or social media

Technology at work

Technical skills

The essential digital skills framework defines the digital skills adults need to safely benefit from, participate in and contribute to the digital world. The framework sets our five categories of essential digital skills for life and work:

  • Communicating, collaborating and sharing information
  • Finding, managing and storing digital content securely
  • Registering, applying, buying and managing services online
  • Using digital tools to find solutions to problems
  • Staying safe, legal and confident online

Out of the five essential skills, it was staying safe online that caused the largest concern.

  • 91% of colleagues can connect a device to a WiFi network independently 91% 91%
  • 77% can independently use digital collaboration tools to meet, share and collaborate with others 77% 77%
  • 88% can use the Intranet or HAL to find information, compared to 97% who can use the Internet 88% 88%
  • 64% believe they can use software such as spreadsheets, with 9% wanting to learn 64% 64%
  • 82% can use digital tools to improve their own productivity, and 7% would like to learn 82% 82%
  • 65% of colleagues can store information online and 10% of respondents would like to learn how to use the Cloud 65% 65%
  • 90% can independently recognise whether information or online content is trustworthy or not 90% 90%
  • 71% have previously accessed payslips and expenses digitally, and 15% of colleagues would like to learn how 71% 71%

Key themes – research interviews

Change, cultural shift and generational differences

  • The origin of care work is ‘hands on’. Many colleagues started their career in this way, so it’s no surprise that they are nervous of change
  • The reasons and drive to learn new skills are different depending on your generation. Some are too scared to try, whereas others are happy to learn new skills

Time

  • It’s difficult to set aside chunks of time to learn new skills
  • Although digital tools will help create more free time, there isn’t the time to get up to speed and implement digital tools
  • If somebody is promoted, no time is available to train them on any new systems that they’re required to use

Infrastructure

  • Access to the Internet is poor for many
  • Mobile phones or tablets are more familiar and portable
  • Many people don’t make the most our of their work phone as they aren’t familiar with how to use it, or don’t believe that it can do what they need it to

Working and communicating digitally

  • Apps are great as they remember logins and allow flexibility to access whichever device you use
  • Working remotely is isolating if your job doesn’t involve cross-working
  • There isn’t one way to communicate to everybody
  • There is no one stop shop for all things Hafod

Infrastructure

  • Access to the internet is poor for many
  • Mobile phones or tablets are more familiar and portable
  • Many people don’t make the most our of their work phone as they aren’t familiar with how to use it, or don’t believe that it can do what they need it to

Working and communicating digitally

  • Apps are great as they remember logins and allow flexibility to access whichever device you use
  • Working remotely is isolating if your job doesn’t involve cross-working
  • There isn’t one way to communicate to everybody
  • There is no one-stop shop for all things Hafod

System training

  • There is a lack of formal or ongoing training on systems
  • It would be useful to have a place to access learning information, without needing to speak to IT
  • There is lots of admin expected in management and senior jobs, but no training to support with this

Digital and e-learning

  • Video training is brilliant as it saves on travel and time
  • It’s difficult to find a two hour slot in the calendar, especially as people’s working patterns change
  • Having smaller bitesize learning that is accessible outside of the  core hours would be beneficial
  • We need more soft skill and people skill training to help built relationships and business partnering
  • E-learning is important, but it’s not always easy to go back and find just one bit of information that you need

Summary

It’s acknowledged that times are changing and that working digitally will improve collaboration and efficiency, but not everybody has the time to learn and not everybody’s learning journey is the same. Many colleagues already having the majority of the five essential digital skills, defining them as ‘digitally included’ and are looking for more advanced digital learning, or wanting training on softer skills like communication and building relationships through the internet.

Learning and access were significant parts of the discussion, as well as well-being of remote working and bitesize learning, with many stating that e-earning and long workshops are not always the best way to retrieve information.

With the vast amount of new systems on their way and the fact that nobody’s day job is going away we acknowledge that digital learning is something that will need to be ongoing and available in many formats, to suit the time, tools and capability of the individual.